[Alt-photo] question

Kim Du Boise krd at photoartsimaging.com
Mon Oct 13 20:39:17 UTC 2014


Hello All,

As a conservator, I recommend buffered papers or enclosures if the budget does not allow for the more costly rag paper.  However, there are at least three types of prints or documents that I tell my clients Do NOT use alkaline reserve AF papers or enclosures for cyanotypes, blueprints, or dye transfer prints.  

The majority of papers made today have some form of calcium used in the pulp during processing to mitigate the acidifying of papers when the lignin in the wood pulp begins to deteriorate and acidify the papers.  This is usually in the much more soluble form of calcium bicarbonate which becomes calcium carbonate during the drying process and loses the water which has the hydroxyl component in the mix. 

If you want to look up acid-free papers & calcium carbonate, the Wikipedia has pretty good (& long, mathematical) explanations of how to figure the reserve, etc.  The testing also has to use deionized water and the atmosphere should be free of most of the excess carbon dioxide to make it work well.  There are a lot of other issues & parameters listed.
 
However, if you are interested in the preservation use of acid-free and buffered or unbuffered papers, here's a link that basically explains it all in plain words.  This is what I recommend to all my institutional and individual clients because storage conditions in this world are not perfect.  It has been mentioned that the average home is not stable (we all know that), but there are also a majority of historic houses, small museums, archives, etc. that have issues that are just as bad. 

BTW, cyanotypes need certain amounts or levels of light…they are prone to dark fading, but will get nice & blue upon return to light & the atmosphere.  Of course, we (or most of us) may well be gone when this happens as we are not young anymore. 

If one puts a barrier paper between the print (each side) and the offending buffered alkaline board, it should mitigate any migration of the alkaline off gassing that may occur during the times of fluctuating temps and RH, as well as the possible migration via contact with the board.  This paper is not a molecular sieve or trap, but has served the profession well over the "non-technical" past and offered protection without the invention of these little gems.  

Link to explanation from an archival manufacturer/vendor:  
http://www.universityproducts.com/resources.php?m=how_to_detail&id=4

Acid-free, lignin-free paper or board without a large alkaline reserve to be set free are fine for matting or use as a backer board.  I would not, however, use any type of "regular" mounting paper to adhere the print to the board.  Use some form of hinging or corners/flat channels to "mount" the print to the backboard.  That is the safest way to deal with these prints, as the normal mounting materials (sheets, sprays, adhesives) are not going to play nice with your prints.  

Hope this helps you, Geert.

Regards,
Kim


Kim R. Du Boise, P. A. - AIC
Senior Conservator
PhotoArts Imaging Professionals, LLC
123 Buchanan Road
Hattiesburg, MS  39401-9545

Local:	601-582-3686
FAX:	601-544-1920
Toll-free:   866-278-3686
www.photoartsimaging.com

On Oct 13, 2014, at 2:06 PM, alt-photo-process-list-request at lists.altphotolist.org wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Re:  question (bobkiss @caribsurf.com)
>   2. Re:  question (Loris Medici)
>   3. Re:  question (bobkiss @caribsurf.com)
>   4. Re:  question (Loris Medici)
> 
> From: "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <bobkiss at caribsurf.com>
> Subject: Re: [Alt-photo] question
> Date: October 13, 2014 7:50:39 AM CDT
> To: "alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org" <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
> 
> 
> DEAR LORIS,
>     Well, here are the facts:
> 1) Barbados is made of an enormous coral reef.
> 2) Coral is made of CaCO3,
> 3) a large part of our water supply comes from underground aquifers which
> leach the CaCO3 out of the coral and deposit it on EVERYTHING.
> 4) Though CaCO3 has a solubility of 15 mg/liter that figure increases
> enormously in the presence of carbon dioxide.  Now, let's take the average
> cyano in the average home where the humidity can vary greatly due to season
> and weather and throw in the prevalence of carbon dioxide in most
> living environments.  The buffer will dissolve in the humidity and leach
> into the print. Ergo, you can kiss your cyano goodby if you use a buffered
> board.
> 5) Our local water authority analyzed the deposits and they are,
> indeed,CaCO3.
>                CHEERS!
>                          BOB
> 
> On Sunday, October 12, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name> wrote:
> 
>> Dear Bob,
>> 
>> You have water soluble calcium or magnesium hydroxide in your waters then,
>> because really, CaCO3 is  insoluble. Google it. (Or try to dissolve
>> chalk...) Calcium has many soluble compounds, but unfortunately, calcium
>> carbonate is not one of them.
>> 
>> Regards,
>> Loris.
>> On Oct 13, 2014 1:06 AM, "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <bobkiss at caribsurf.com
>> <javascript:;>>
>> wrote:
>> 
>>> DEAR LORIS,
>>>     The water supply in Barbados disproves your statement that calcium
>>> carbonate is practically insoluble!  There is so much CaCO3 dissolved in
>>> our water that it leaves deposits everywhere and makes developers pH too
>>> high.  I have to mix EVERYTHING with distilled water.  Further, a high
>>> humidity environment would cause CaCO3 to leach from the buffered board
>>> into the cyano print and bleach it.
>>>     I still prefer good ol' 100% cotton museum board with nothing added
>>> for mounting all my prints.  There are also the high tech papers with ion
>>> traps...up to you.
>>>                       CHEERS!
>>>                                   BOB
>>> 
>>> On Sunday, October 12, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name
>> <javascript:;>> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> Hi Gert,
>>>> 
>>>> I don't think you absolutely have to omit alkaline buffered boards for
>>>> mounting cyanotypes; there isn't any way for the alkaline buffer in the
>>>> board to reach the cyanotype image that sits on the opposite side of
>> the
>>>> mounted paper - even so in the case where the composite is fully
>>> submerged
>>>> in water; calcium carbonate is practically insoluble...
>>>> 
>>>> OTOH, when making cyanotypes, you have to refrain from papers with
>>> alkaline
>>>> buffer and any alkaline solution during processing.
>>>> 
>>>> Regards,
>>>> Loris.
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> 2014-10-12 23:28 GMT+03:00 Christian Nze <christnze at gmail.com
>> <javascript:;>
>>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>>> 
>>>>> acid free but not with alcalin reserve.
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> 2014-10-12 19:41 GMT+02:00 Geert Hoekstra <ghoekstra at solcon.nl
>> <javascript:;>
>>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>>>> 
>>>>>> I would like to ask how to best frame a print made with gum over
>>>>> cyanotype.
>>>>>> Can you use acid free board? For cyanotype this is not recommended,
>>> but
>>>>>> this
>>>>>> is a combination of two processes.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Geert Hoekstra
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> --
>>>>> Christan Nze
>>>>> Fine art photographer
>>>>> <http://www.pixtopap.fr>
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>> 
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> From: Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name>
> Subject: Re: [Alt-photo] question
> Date: October 13, 2014 8:27:38 AM CDT
> To: The alternative photographic processes mailing list <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
> 
> 
> Thanks Bob, (for the enlightment about Barbados' water quality)
> 
> Nevetheless, it's overkill to use special alkali free and/or ion trap
> mounting boards for cyanotypes, using those expensive materials is only
> useful in the peace of mind domain. I believe that leaching hypothesis
> won't happen - sounds like a myth to me.
> 
> Actually this is a nice thing to test: I recently moved and my darkroom is
> still packed - as soon as I unpack my materials, I will dry mount a
> cyanotype (made on thin Masa paper) onto highly buffered Fabriano Artistico
> paper and keep the composite in water for 24h. Will provide the before and
> after scans, that way we can see and quantify any probable adverse effect -
> in the worst possible scenario.
> 
> Regards,
> Loris.
> 
> 
> 2014-10-13 15:50 GMT+03:00 bobkiss @caribsurf.com <bobkiss at caribsurf.com>:
> 
>> DEAR LORIS,
>>     Well, here are the facts:
>> 1) Barbados is made of an enormous coral reef.
>> 2) Coral is made of CaCO3,
>> 3) a large part of our water supply comes from underground aquifers which
>> leach the CaCO3 out of the coral and deposit it on EVERYTHING.
>> 4) Though CaCO3 has a solubility of 15 mg/liter that figure increases
>> enormously in the presence of carbon dioxide.  Now, let's take the average
>> cyano in the average home where the humidity can vary greatly due to season
>> and weather and throw in the prevalence of carbon dioxide in most
>> living environments.  The buffer will dissolve in the humidity and leach
>> into the print. Ergo, you can kiss your cyano goodby if you use a buffered
>> board.
>> 5) Our local water authority analyzed the deposits and they are,
>> indeed,CaCO3.
>>                CHEERS!
>>                          BOB
>> 
>> On Sunday, October 12, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name> wrote:
>> 
>>> Dear Bob,
>>> 
>>> You have water soluble calcium or magnesium hydroxide in your waters
>> then,
>>> because really, CaCO3 is  insoluble. Google it. (Or try to dissolve
>>> chalk...) Calcium has many soluble compounds, but unfortunately, calcium
>>> carbonate is not one of them.
>>> 
>>> Regards,
>>> Loris.
>>> On Oct 13, 2014 1:06 AM, "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <bobkiss at caribsurf.com
>>> <javascript:;>>
>>> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> DEAR LORIS,
>>>>     The water supply in Barbados disproves your statement that calcium
>>>> carbonate is practically insoluble!  There is so much CaCO3 dissolved
>> in
>>>> our water that it leaves deposits everywhere and makes developers pH
>> too
>>>> high.  I have to mix EVERYTHING with distilled water.  Further, a high
>>>> humidity environment would cause CaCO3 to leach from the buffered board
>>>> into the cyano print and bleach it.
>>>>     I still prefer good ol' 100% cotton museum board with nothing
>> added
>>>> for mounting all my prints.  There are also the high tech papers with
>> ion
>>>> traps...up to you.
>>>>                       CHEERS!
>>>>                                   BOB
>>>> 
>>>> On Sunday, October 12, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name
>>> <javascript:;>> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> Hi Gert,
>>>>> 
>>>>> I don't think you absolutely have to omit alkaline buffered boards
>> for
>>>>> mounting cyanotypes; there isn't any way for the alkaline buffer in
>> the
>>>>> board to reach the cyanotype image that sits on the opposite side of
>>> the
>>>>> mounted paper - even so in the case where the composite is fully
>>>> submerged
>>>>> in water; calcium carbonate is practically insoluble...
>>>>> 
>>>>> OTOH, when making cyanotypes, you have to refrain from papers with
>>>> alkaline
>>>>> buffer and any alkaline solution during processing.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Regards,
>>>>> Loris.
>>>>> 
>>>>> 
>>>>> 2014-10-12 23:28 GMT+03:00 Christian Nze <christnze at gmail.com
>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>>>> 
>>>>>> acid free but not with alcalin reserve.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 2014-10-12 19:41 GMT+02:00 Geert Hoekstra <ghoekstra at solcon.nl
>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> I would like to ask how to best frame a print made with gum over
>>>>>> cyanotype.
>>>>>>> Can you use acid free board? For cyanotype this is not
>> recommended,
>>>> but
>>>>>>> this
>>>>>>> is a combination of two processes.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Geert Hoekstra
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> Christan Nze
>>>>>> Fine art photographer
>>>>>> <http://www.pixtopap.fr>
>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>> 
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>> 
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> From: "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <bobkiss at caribsurf.com>
> Subject: Re: [Alt-photo] question
> Date: October 13, 2014 2:03:22 PM CDT
> To: "alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org" <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
> 
> 
> DEAR LORIS,
>      Try dissolving some carbon dioxide in the water (perhaps adding some
> club soda, soda water or seltzer) and see what happens.
>                CHEERS,
>                                 BOB
> 
> On Monday, October 13, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name> wrote:
> 
>> Thanks Bob, (for the enlightment about Barbados' water quality)
>> 
>> Nevetheless, it's overkill to use special alkali free and/or ion trap
>> mounting boards for cyanotypes, using those expensive materials is only
>> useful in the peace of mind domain. I believe that leaching hypothesis
>> won't happen - sounds like a myth to me.
>> 
>> Actually this is a nice thing to test: I recently moved and my darkroom is
>> still packed - as soon as I unpack my materials, I will dry mount a
>> cyanotype (made on thin Masa paper) onto highly buffered Fabriano Artistico
>> paper and keep the composite in water for 24h. Will provide the before and
>> after scans, that way we can see and quantify any probable adverse effect -
>> in the worst possible scenario.
>> 
>> Regards,
>> Loris.
>> 
>> 
>> 2014-10-13 15:50 GMT+03:00 bobkiss @caribsurf.com <bobkiss at caribsurf.com
>> <javascript:;>>:
>> 
>>> DEAR LORIS,
>>>     Well, here are the facts:
>>> 1) Barbados is made of an enormous coral reef.
>>> 2) Coral is made of CaCO3,
>>> 3) a large part of our water supply comes from underground aquifers which
>>> leach the CaCO3 out of the coral and deposit it on EVERYTHING.
>>> 4) Though CaCO3 has a solubility of 15 mg/liter that figure increases
>>> enormously in the presence of carbon dioxide.  Now, let's take the
>> average
>>> cyano in the average home where the humidity can vary greatly due to
>> season
>>> and weather and throw in the prevalence of carbon dioxide in most
>>> living environments.  The buffer will dissolve in the humidity and leach
>>> into the print. Ergo, you can kiss your cyano goodby if you use a
>> buffered
>>> board.
>>> 5) Our local water authority analyzed the deposits and they are,
>>> indeed,CaCO3.
>>>                CHEERS!
>>>                          BOB
>>> 
>>> On Sunday, October 12, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name
>> <javascript:;>> wrote:
>>> 
>>>> Dear Bob,
>>>> 
>>>> You have water soluble calcium or magnesium hydroxide in your waters
>>> then,
>>>> because really, CaCO3 is  insoluble. Google it. (Or try to dissolve
>>>> chalk...) Calcium has many soluble compounds, but unfortunately,
>> calcium
>>>> carbonate is not one of them.
>>>> 
>>>> Regards,
>>>> Loris.
>>>> On Oct 13, 2014 1:06 AM, "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <
>> bobkiss at caribsurf.com <javascript:;>
>>>> <javascript:;>>
>>>> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> DEAR LORIS,
>>>>>     The water supply in Barbados disproves your statement that
>> calcium
>>>>> carbonate is practically insoluble!  There is so much CaCO3 dissolved
>>> in
>>>>> our water that it leaves deposits everywhere and makes developers pH
>>> too
>>>>> high.  I have to mix EVERYTHING with distilled water.  Further, a
>> high
>>>>> humidity environment would cause CaCO3 to leach from the buffered
>> board
>>>>> into the cyano print and bleach it.
>>>>>     I still prefer good ol' 100% cotton museum board with nothing
>>> added
>>>>> for mounting all my prints.  There are also the high tech papers with
>>> ion
>>>>> traps...up to you.
>>>>>                       CHEERS!
>>>>>                                   BOB
>>>>> 
>>>>> On Sunday, October 12, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name
>> <javascript:;>
>>>> <javascript:;>> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>>> Hi Gert,
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> I don't think you absolutely have to omit alkaline buffered boards
>>> for
>>>>>> mounting cyanotypes; there isn't any way for the alkaline buffer in
>>> the
>>>>>> board to reach the cyanotype image that sits on the opposite side
>> of
>>>> the
>>>>>> mounted paper - even so in the case where the composite is fully
>>>>> submerged
>>>>>> in water; calcium carbonate is practically insoluble...
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> OTOH, when making cyanotypes, you have to refrain from papers with
>>>>> alkaline
>>>>>> buffer and any alkaline solution during processing.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>> Loris.
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> 2014-10-12 23:28 GMT+03:00 Christian Nze <christnze at gmail.com
>> <javascript:;>
>>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> acid free but not with alcalin reserve.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 2014-10-12 19:41 GMT+02:00 Geert Hoekstra <ghoekstra at solcon.nl
>> <javascript:;>
>>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> I would like to ask how to best frame a print made with gum
>> over
>>>>>>> cyanotype.
>>>>>>>> Can you use acid free board? For cyanotype this is not
>>> recommended,
>>>>> but
>>>>>>>> this
>>>>>>>> is a combination of two processes.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> Geert Hoekstra
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>> Christan Nze
>>>>>>> Fine art photographer
>>>>>>> <http://www.pixtopap.fr>
>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>> 
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>> 
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> From: Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name>
> Subject: Re: [Alt-photo] question
> Date: October 13, 2014 2:06:23 PM CDT
> To: The alternative photographic processes mailing list <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
> 
> 
> Will do that too; but mind that dissolved CO2 is acidic (that's why it
> dissolves CaCO3)
> 
> Regards,
> Loris.
> On Oct 13, 2014 10:03 PM, "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <bobkiss at caribsurf.com>
> wrote:
> 
>> DEAR LORIS,
>>      Try dissolving some carbon dioxide in the water (perhaps adding some
>> club soda, soda water or seltzer) and see what happens.
>>                CHEERS,
>>                                 BOB
>> 
>> On Monday, October 13, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name> wrote:
>> 
>>> Thanks Bob, (for the enlightment about Barbados' water quality)
>>> 
>>> Nevetheless, it's overkill to use special alkali free and/or ion trap
>>> mounting boards for cyanotypes, using those expensive materials is only
>>> useful in the peace of mind domain. I believe that leaching hypothesis
>>> won't happen - sounds like a myth to me.
>>> 
>>> Actually this is a nice thing to test: I recently moved and my darkroom
>> is
>>> still packed - as soon as I unpack my materials, I will dry mount a
>>> cyanotype (made on thin Masa paper) onto highly buffered Fabriano
>> Artistico
>>> paper and keep the composite in water for 24h. Will provide the before
>> and
>>> after scans, that way we can see and quantify any probable adverse
>> effect -
>>> in the worst possible scenario.
>>> 
>>> Regards,
>>> Loris.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 2014-10-13 15:50 GMT+03:00 bobkiss @caribsurf.com <bobkiss at caribsurf.com
>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>> 
>>>> DEAR LORIS,
>>>>     Well, here are the facts:
>>>> 1) Barbados is made of an enormous coral reef.
>>>> 2) Coral is made of CaCO3,
>>>> 3) a large part of our water supply comes from underground aquifers
>> which
>>>> leach the CaCO3 out of the coral and deposit it on EVERYTHING.
>>>> 4) Though CaCO3 has a solubility of 15 mg/liter that figure increases
>>>> enormously in the presence of carbon dioxide.  Now, let's take the
>>> average
>>>> cyano in the average home where the humidity can vary greatly due to
>>> season
>>>> and weather and throw in the prevalence of carbon dioxide in most
>>>> living environments.  The buffer will dissolve in the humidity and
>> leach
>>>> into the print. Ergo, you can kiss your cyano goodby if you use a
>>> buffered
>>>> board.
>>>> 5) Our local water authority analyzed the deposits and they are,
>>>> indeed,CaCO3.
>>>>                CHEERS!
>>>>                          BOB
>>>> 
>>>> On Sunday, October 12, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name
>>> <javascript:;>> wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> Dear Bob,
>>>>> 
>>>>> You have water soluble calcium or magnesium hydroxide in your waters
>>>> then,
>>>>> because really, CaCO3 is  insoluble. Google it. (Or try to dissolve
>>>>> chalk...) Calcium has many soluble compounds, but unfortunately,
>>> calcium
>>>>> carbonate is not one of them.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Regards,
>>>>> Loris.
>>>>> On Oct 13, 2014 1:06 AM, "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <
>>> bobkiss at caribsurf.com <javascript:;>
>>>>> <javascript:;>>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>> 
>>>>>> DEAR LORIS,
>>>>>>     The water supply in Barbados disproves your statement that
>>> calcium
>>>>>> carbonate is practically insoluble!  There is so much CaCO3
>> dissolved
>>>> in
>>>>>> our water that it leaves deposits everywhere and makes developers
>> pH
>>>> too
>>>>>> high.  I have to mix EVERYTHING with distilled water.  Further, a
>>> high
>>>>>> humidity environment would cause CaCO3 to leach from the buffered
>>> board
>>>>>> into the cyano print and bleach it.
>>>>>>     I still prefer good ol' 100% cotton museum board with nothing
>>>> added
>>>>>> for mounting all my prints.  There are also the high tech papers
>> with
>>>> ion
>>>>>> traps...up to you.
>>>>>>                       CHEERS!
>>>>>>                                   BOB
>>>>>> 
>>>>>> On Sunday, October 12, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name
>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>> <javascript:;>> wrote:
>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Hi Gert,
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> I don't think you absolutely have to omit alkaline buffered
>> boards
>>>> for
>>>>>>> mounting cyanotypes; there isn't any way for the alkaline buffer
>> in
>>>> the
>>>>>>> board to reach the cyanotype image that sits on the opposite side
>>> of
>>>>> the
>>>>>>> mounted paper - even so in the case where the composite is fully
>>>>>> submerged
>>>>>>> in water; calcium carbonate is practically insoluble...
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> OTOH, when making cyanotypes, you have to refrain from papers
>> with
>>>>>> alkaline
>>>>>>> buffer and any alkaline solution during processing.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> Regards,
>>>>>>> Loris.
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> 2014-10-12 23:28 GMT+03:00 Christian Nze <christnze at gmail.com
>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> acid free but not with alcalin reserve.
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 2014-10-12 19:41 GMT+02:00 Geert Hoekstra <ghoekstra at solcon.nl
>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>> <javascript:;>
>>>>>>> <javascript:;>>:
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> I would like to ask how to best frame a print made with gum
>>> over
>>>>>>>> cyanotype.
>>>>>>>>> Can you use acid free board? For cyanotype this is not
>>>> recommended,
>>>>>> but
>>>>>>>>> this
>>>>>>>>> is a combination of two processes.
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> Geert Hoekstra
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>>> Christan Nze
>>>>>>>> Fine art photographer
>>>>>>>> <http://www.pixtopap.fr>
>>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>>>> 
>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>>> 
>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>>> 
>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>>> 
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org



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