[Alt-photo] question

Loris Medici mail at loris.medici.name
Mon Oct 13 21:31:07 UTC 2014


BTW, meanwhile, you may want read this document by Mike Ware:

Page address: http://www.mikeware.co.uk/mikeware/conservation.html
Document name: A Blueprint for Conserving Cyanotypes
Link to the document:
http://www.mikeware.co.uk/downloads/Conserving_Cyanotypes.doc

Excerpt:
"...
*The question of buffered storage enclosures and mounts*
It is now generally-accepted conservation practice that cyanotypes should
not be mounted on, or stored in alkaline-buffered materials. Calcium
carbonate clearly poses a threat to cyanotypes when in direct contact with
the image; but it has little ability to migrate through cellulose, so the
dangers of chalk-buffered enclosures can be overstated. It seems prudent,
however, to continue the use of unbuffered materials for the mounting or
wrapping of cyanotypes, where direct contact is involved.
..."
​(emphasis in red mine...)

Since the mounting board won't be in direct contact​ with the image (the
board is on the back side, the image is on the front...), recommending
special non-buffered boards or boards with so-called ion traps for mounting
cyanotypes is overkill - the exact point I'm trying to make since the
beginning...

Will do the experiment nonetheless.

Regards,
Loris.


2014-10-13 23:47 GMT+03:00 Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name>:

> You'll reach to an equilibrium with alkali carbonate and acid carbon
> dioxide - that was my point...
>
> Will do two sets; one with normal water, one with dissolved carbondioxide
> (water + dry ice) and report.
>  On Oct 13, 2014 11:10 PM, "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <bobkiss at caribsurf.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Precisely the problem with CO2 in the atmosphere in the average room
>> making
>> the CaCO3 more soluble and, therefore, more likely to leach into the
>> cyano!
>>
>> On Monday, October 13, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name> wrote:
>>
>> > Will do that too; but mind that dissolved CO2 is acidic (that's why it
>> > dissolves CaCO3)
>> >
>> > Regards,
>> > Loris.
>> >  On Oct 13, 2014 10:03 PM, "bobkiss @caribsurf.com" <
>> bobkiss at caribsurf.com
>> > <javascript:;>>
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > > DEAR LORIS,
>> > >       Try dissolving some carbon dioxide in the water (perhaps adding
>> > some
>> > > club soda, soda water or seltzer) and see what happens.
>> > >                 CHEERS,
>> > >                                  BOB
>> > >
>> > > On Monday, October 13, 2014, Loris Medici <mail at loris.medici.name
>> > <javascript:;>> wrote:
>> > >
>> > > > Thanks Bob, (for the enlightment about Barbados' water quality)
>> > > >
>> > > > Nevetheless, it's overkill to use special alkali free and/or ion
>> trap
>> > > > mounting boards for cyanotypes, using those expensive materials is
>> only
>> > > > useful in the peace of mind domain. I believe that leaching
>> hypothesis
>> > > > won't happen - sounds like a myth to me.
>> > > >
>> > > > Actually this is a nice thing to test: I recently moved and my
>> darkroom
>> > > is
>> > > > still packed - as soon as I unpack my materials, I will dry mount a
>> > > > cyanotype (made on thin Masa paper) onto highly buffered Fabriano
>> > > Artistico
>> > > > paper and keep the composite in water for 24h. Will provide the
>> before
>> > > and
>> > > > after scans, that way we can see and quantify any probable adverse
>> > > effect -
>> > > > in the worst possible scenario.
>> > > >
>> > > > Regards,
>> > > > Loris.
>> > > >
>> > > >
>> > > > 2014-10-13 15:50 GMT+03:00 bobkiss @caribsurf.com <
>> > bobkiss at caribsurf.com <javascript:;>
>> > > > <javascript:;>>:
>> > > >
>> > > > > DEAR LORIS,
>> > > > >      Well, here are the facts:
>> > > > > 1) Barbados is made of an enormous coral reef.
>> > > > > 2) Coral is made of CaCO3,
>> > > > > 3) a large part of our water supply comes from underground
>> aquifers
>> > > which
>> > > > > leach the CaCO3 out of the coral and deposit it on EVERYTHING.
>> > > > > 4) Though CaCO3 has a solubility of 15 mg/liter that figure
>> increases
>> > > > > enormously in the presence of carbon dioxide.  Now, let's take the
>> > > > average
>> > > > > cyano in the average home where the humidity can vary greatly due
>> to
>> > > > season
>> > > > > and weather and throw in the prevalence of carbon dioxide in most
>> > > > > living environments.  The buffer will dissolve in the humidity and
>> > > leach
>> > > > > into the print. Ergo, you can kiss your cyano goodby if you use a
>> > > > buffered
>> > > > > board.
>> > > > > 5) Our local water authority analyzed the deposits and they are,
>> > > > > indeed,CaCO3.
>> > > > >                 CHEERS!
>> > > > >                           BOB
>>
>


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