[Alt-photo] Another good paper for cyanotype

Anne Chansonette chansonette at gmail.com
Tue Feb 6 01:39:49 UTC 2018


Since cyanotypes are in the discussion currently, can I ask if anyone has
experience with printing cyanotype on fired ceramics? I've been trying to
print on porcelain and so far the results are pretty lackluster. Also, does
anyone have a source for more info on that OR on the dangers/ possibilities
of printing on bisqued porcelain and then firing to vitrification? I
believe that firing cyanotype chemistry to high temperatures would result
in toxic fumes, but I have seen photos of fired cyanotypes on ceramic
(which turn dark red/ brown not blue), so it has been done, though perhaps
not safely? Any leads on further info or sources would be appreciated!

Best,
Anne Eder
www.anneeder.com

On Mon, Feb 5, 2018 at 9:50 AM, Christina Z. Anderson via
Alt-photo-process-list <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
wrote:

> Keith,
>
> Yeah, the wait for Herschel is long and the price with shipping is a bit
> beyond student budgets. Europe is lucky in the availability of some great
> papers and some great paper stores.
>
> Thanks for the tips on the two Japanese papers.
>
> If you cannot get the traditional cyanotype to work this may work for you
> as it did for me in this dry climate: dilute your A (if it is 20%) to a 10
> % FAC and increase your PF to 10%. It absorbs into the paper better and
> prints a smoother, less gritty tone with less wash-off. It also is,
> surprisingly, faster on most papers I have tested (of course, all problems
> that the Ware formula solves).
>
> When compiling a chart of 100+ formulas throughout history, I noticed the
> FAC:PF was all over the place albeit not often more PF than FAC. I thought
> I would start, then, with equal proportions and move up in FAC from there.
> I ended up staying with 10/10 because it looked great.
>
> When I started the cyanotype class in school I reverted to my usual 20/10
> mix I always use for the class, and noted an immediate problem with grain
> and grit and wash off again. I went back to the 10/10 and their prints
> looked great (and were faster by1/2-1 stop, not slower).
>
> Chris
>
>
> > On Feb 4, 2018, at 9:53 PM, Keith Schreiber <keith at jkschreiber.com>
> wrote:
> >
> > Hi Chris,
> >
> > I had to take a break from paper and process testing, which you know is
> just about my favorite thing too, to get some actual printing done and
> prepare for a couple of workshops, but I intend to be back at it by early
> summer.
> >
> > I've just got a couple comments for you:
> >
> > Herschel - I bought a bunch about a year ago and it took a month to get
> here. It was shipped quickly enough and was at US customs in less than a
> week, but then it sat there for about 3 weeks. Contraband paper dontcha
> know! I haven't done anything with it yet other than a couple quick tests.
> I'm gonna have to tweak my standard Pd process for it, but I'm hoping it
> works well with the Malde-Ware POP process which I am finally learning.
> >
> > I can't seem to get anything to work with classic cyanotype here, but
> two Japanese papers that do work well with "New Cyanotype" are Tosa
> Hakkinshi and Sekishi Torinoko Gampi. The latter is exceedingly smooth but
> a bit more contrasty than other papers I've tested with that process. Both
> are available from Hiromi.
> >
> > I look forward to trying the Sumi-e.
> >
> > Cheers,
> > Keith
> >
> >
> >> On Feb 3, 2018, at 1:10 PM, Christina Z. Anderson via
> Alt-photo-process-list <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Dear All,
> >>
> >> Might have missed some of the emails because I’m out of town. Thank you
> to those who are interested! I’ve been on this paper testing gamut for so
> many months now, it seems, that I feel like a lone voice crying in the
> wilderness.
> >>
> >> The fact that the paper is unbuffered really made my ears perk up in
> regards to cyanotype. I am unaware of which washis are unbuffered or if
> they are as a general rule. So much of the time those details are
> unspecified.
> >>
> >> I have these papers specified as unbuffered and made for alt processes
> (Sumi-e is made for sumi ink processes).
> >> 1.         Arches Platine, two weights
> >>
> >> 2.         Awagami Platinum Gampi, two weights
> >>
> >> 3.         Awagami Platinum Mitsumata
> >>
> >> 4.         Bergger Cot 320, two weights
> >>
> >> 5.         Hahnemühle Platinum Rag
> >>
> >> 6.        Herschel Platinotype
> >>
> >> 7.         Legion Revere Platinum
> >>
> >> Kees, there are papers that you get in the Netherlands that are just
> impossible to get here. I can get Schut, for instance, but darned if I can
> get Simile Japon or some other names (Tershellong or something?) And
> Herschel, heck, I ordered some several weeks ago, costing about $17USD a
> sheet, and it has yet to arrive. So unfortunately some good papers can be
> Euro- or Amero-centric.
> >>
> >> I can’t wait to hear how Sumi-e is with platinum and salt.
> >>
> >> I do not have the extensive experience as some of you do, of printing
> on washi, but these I have tried (bold are faves; crossed out are
> eliminated either because they are unsuitable or they fell down the list in
> suitability):
> >> Legion Kitakata,
> >> Legion Hosho,
> >> Legion Masa,
> >> Legion Okawara,
> >> Legion Goyu,
> >> Legion Thai Kozo
> >> Awagami Platinum Gampi
> >> Awagami Platinum Mitsumata
> >>
> >> (Keith, aren’t you proud of me, using exact names?)
> >>
> >> I also have a bunch of washi I bought in Japan years ago but
> unfortunately I do not have the English names of any so they are not
> included in my latest tests. And some of those papers, one $60 a sheet,
> were not good for cyanotype, either pilling, printing too dull blue-gray,
> or disintegrating in the water like toilet paper (as Legion Hosho did for
> me).
> >>
> >> So why I wax poetic about this paper is that by comparison it prints
> very smooth tones, a turquoise blue more than navy blue or gray navy as
> some do, and without pilling or tearing when hanging, etc. And the way it
> is packaged in pads is overkill-protective. But when you compare the price
> of Sumi-e to Awagami ($12 a sheet), you can see why as a professor I was
> very excited for my students to be able to find a reasonably priced washi
> to have their first washi experience with. The cyanotype class will have
> prints due on Sumi-e on Monday and we’ll develop curves for it after that.
> Its absorbency might be a deal-breaker for platinum printers without
> resorting to some sort of dilution of chemistry but we’ll soon find out
> from you platinum aficionados. I only print cyanoplati so would not use
> this paper for a double-print.
> >>
> >> Chris
> >>
> >>
> >>> On Feb 3, 2018, at 3:06 AM, Kees Brandenburg <workshops at polychrome.nl>
> wrote:
> >>> Found it in the Netherlands too: 50x65cm, 80gr. 20 sheets (not in pad)
> €21,80
> >>> Kees
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
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> >
>
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