[Alt-photo] DOUG ISHIMURA, IPI re: DOES LIGNIN CONTENT IN PAPER KEEP IT FROM BEING ARCHIVAL?

Don Bryant donsbryant at gmail.com
Wed Jan 17 01:30:19 UTC 2018


Bob Kiss,

>
 many of the "Free" online book services (Google Books) will not allow us
to download in this region
>

You can circumvent this problem by using a VPN service. This is how people
in, say for example Australia, are able to watch Netflix, Hulu and so
forth.

Don Bryant




On Tue, Jan 16, 2018 at 11:36 AM, bobkiss caribsurf.com via
Alt-photo-process-list <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
wrote:

> DEAR SIEGFRIED,
>
>      I would love a PDF of it because it is hard to get printed matter
> here in Barbados and many of the "Free" online book services (Google Books)
> will not allow us to download in this region.  Perhaps it is because the
> pirates are alive and well in the Caribbean but, instead of carrying
> sabers, they carry laptops and steal intellectual properties!  But they
> STILL have gold earrings!  LOL!!!
>
>                                        CHEERS!
>                                             BOB
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org" <
> alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
> To: "Jacques Kevers" <jacqueskv at gmail.com>, "alt-photo-process-list at lists.
> altphotolist.org" <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>
> Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 11:59:12 AM
> Subject: Re: [Alt-photo] DOUG ISHIMURA, IPI re: DOES LIGNIN CONTENT IN
> PAPER KEEP IT FROM BEING ARCHIVAL?
>
> Christina,
> The Complete Photographer (c 1942, 1943 & 1949) provides a discussion on
> the sequence photo paper manufacturers went through to chemically process
> wood pulp for photo paper manufacturing.
> In the section titled Bromide Papers and Bromide Enlargements, by Lou
> Gibson of Eastman Kodak, pg 500 the process is described, as well as a bit
> of the paper making history for photo papers.
> If you can't get a copy of this I'd be happy to PDF it for you.
>
> On Tue, Jan 16, 2018 at 4:20 AM, Jacques Kevers via Alt-photo-process-list
> <
> alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org> wrote:
>
> > Early papers were made exclusively on rag paper, as wood pulp could not
> be
> > purified sufficiently for photographic purposes until the first
> (mechanical
> > or thermomechanical) processes  were replaced by chemical treatments such
> > as the sulfite process. Research at the Eastman Kodak Co. following World
> > War I led to a full conversion to wood pulp for papermaking in 1929.
> Other
> > manufacturers made the conversion around that same time.
> >
> > Chemical treatments such as the sulfite process (sulfates was used for
> > kraft paper) allowed for the complete elimination of lignins, gums,
> resins,
> > etc..., the only drawback being on one side that the process being
> acidic,
> > might hydrolyze some of the cellulose, and weaken the pulp fibers, and on
> > the other side that acidic traces might remain and had to be neutralized
> in
> > some way. In the 1980's, international standards were defined for
> > acid-free, fully archival papers.
> >
> > I was in Paris yesterday to visit the Irving Penn show. Besides of the
> > pt/pd prints, there were lots of original silver gelatin prints. It was
> > interesting to compare side-by-side some of them from the late forties,
> > with other other from the eighties or nineties. I was impressed as I was
> > not able to detect any trace of aging, yellowing, etc.. whatsoever....
> >
> > Best,
> > Jacques
> >
> >
> > Jacques Kevers
> > Beau Site
> > Première Avenue 7
> > B-1330 Rixensart
> > Belgium
> > +32 2 653 56 02
> >
> > 2018-01-16 4:18 GMT+01:00 Christina Z. Anderson via
> Alt-photo-process-list
> > <
> > alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>:
> >
> > > aHA. This is perfect. Thanks, Keith. When it says 100% sulphite from
> what
> > > you are saying it seems that is a lignin free cellulose I am assuming.
> > > I have not ordered from McClain’s yet. Is that a good source for
> Japanese
> > > papers? Thanks for the web sources. I don’t think I am asking the right
> > > search questions because so much stuff comes up that is not helpful.
> > > Chris
> > >
> > > Christina Z. Anderson
> > > Contemporary Practices in Alternative Process Photography series <
> > > https://www.routledge.com/Contemporary-Practices-in-
> Alternative-Process-
> > > Photography/book-series/CPAPP>
> > >
> > >
> > > > On Jan 15, 2018, at 7:55 PM, Keith Schreiber <keith at jkschreiber.com>
> > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > In a nutshell, alpha-cellulose it what we want whether it is from
> > cotton
> > > fiber, bast fibers, wood-pulp, or any other source. Cotton is a high
> > alpha
> > > cellulose fiber. The sulfite (sulphite) process is one way of obtaining
> > it
> > > from wood-pulp by removing the lignin and hemicellulose.
> > > >
> > > > Here are some links that might be of help:
> > > >
> > > > http://cameo.mfa.org/wiki/Alpha_cellulose <
> http://cameo.mfa.org/wiki/
> > > Alpha_cellulose>
> > > > http://cameo.mfa.org/wiki/Sulfite_process <
> http://cameo.mfa.org/wiki/
> > > Sulfite_process>
> > > >
> > > > While I think a paper like Masa is probably fairly "archival", it has
> > > other shortcomings due to short fibers which make for a weaker sheet,
> and
> > > being too brightly bleached in my opinion. You might also be interested
> > to
> > > know that there is a hand-made dosa-sized paper called Masa available
> > from
> > > McClain's Printmaking Supply <http://www.imcclains.com/
> > > catalog/paper/groupc.html> that is very nice.
> > > >
> > > > Keith
> > > >
> > > > Keith Schreiber
> > > > jkschreiber.com <http://jkschreiber.com/>
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >> On Jan 15, 2018, at 6:49 PM, Christina Z. Anderson via
> > > Alt-photo-process-list <alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org
> > > <mailto:alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org>> wrote:
> > > >>
> > > >> Bob,
> > > >>
> > > >> Thanks for checking on this, but I’m still unclear on one important
> > > detail.
> > > >>
> > > >> Can you ask Doug if 100% sulphite or 100% high alpha cellulose is
> > > lignin free? I thought I read that these removed lignin. The reason I
> ask
> > > is there are some high end papers that have these ingredients now and
> > Masa
> > > is one that is 100% sulphite. And I don’t know a lignin from a hole in
> my
> > > head so it’d sure clarify it for me :)
> > > >>
> > > >> Chris
> > > >>
> > > >> Christina Z. Anderson
> > > >> Contemporary Practices in Alternative Process Photography series <
> > > https://www.routledge.com/Contemporary-Practices-in-
> Alternative-Process-
> > > Photography/book-series/CPAPP <https://www.routledge.com/
> > > Contemporary-Practices-in-Alternative-Process-
> > > Photography/book-series/CPAPP>>
> > > >>
> > > >>
> > > >>> On Jan 15, 2018, at 6:42 PM, bobkiss caribsurf.com <
> > > http://caribsurf.com/> via Alt-photo-process-list <
> > > alt-photo-process-list at lists.altphotolist.org <mailto:
> alt-photo-process-
> > > list at lists.altphotolist.org>> wrote:
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Below is info from Doug Ishimura of IPI on lignins forwarded with
> his
> > > permission:
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Lignin has been a very big issue in the deterioration of
> photographs.
> > > Even the Fading Committee of 1855 noted that poor quality mount boards
> > were
> > > a cause for fading photographs.
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> In the 1960s and again in the 1980s, lignin from poor quality
> > > cardboard microfilm boxes were implicated in the formation of red spots
> > or
> > > redox blemishes on microfilm. These spots are a form of silver image
> > > deterioration. As it turns out, the lignin, a complex, undefined
> organic
> > > molecule, generates peroxides as it breaks down. It also produces
> > molecules
> > > that are referred to as chromophores that cause staining of the gelatin
> > and
> > > albumen in photographs.
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Peroxides are bad because they can remove electrons from silver
> > > converting image silver to mobile, silver ions (silver oxidation) and
> can
> > > provide electrons to convert silver ions into elemental silver atoms
> > > (reduction). This wouldn’t be a problem if both events occurred
> > immediately
> > > together, but they don’t and the silver ion has plenty of time to
> migrate
> > > away from the silver image particle where it originated.
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> The result that we see is yellow/orange/red staining of highlights
> > and
> > > mid-tones, silver mirroring, fading, and red spots.
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> The photographic activity test in ISO 18916, which is required in
> the
> > > enclosure standard, ISO 18902, looks for both staining of proteins such
> > as
> > > gelatin and albumen and silver particle oxidation or reduction.
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> -Doug
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> From: bobkiss caribsurf.com <http://caribsurf.com/> [ [ mailto:
> > > bobkiss at caribsurf.com <mailto:bobkiss at caribsurf.com> | mailto:
> > > bobkiss at caribsurf.com <mailto:bobkiss at caribsurf.com> ] ]
> > > >>> Sent: Monday, January 15, 2018 11:26 AM
> > > >>> To: Douglas Nishimura < [ mailto:dwnpph at rit.edu <mailto:
> > dwnpph at rit.edu>
> > > | dwnpph at rit.edu <mailto:dwnpph at rit.edu> ] >
> > > >>> Subject: DOES LIGNIN CONTENT IN PAPER KEEP IT FROM BEING ARCHIVAL?
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> DEAR DOUG,
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> Does lignin content in paper keep it from being archival? I seem to
> > > recall that we used 100% cotton paper for our hand made prints because
> it
> > > was lignin free.
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> CHEERS!
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> BOB
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>>
> > > >>> _______________________________________________
> > > >>> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org <
> http://altphotolist.org/>
> > > >>
> > > >> _______________________________________________
> > > >> Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org <http://altphotolist.org/
> >
> > > >
> > >
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > Alt-photo-process-list | altphotolist.org
> > >
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> >
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